The shadow of penal supervision

Pervasive Punishment, summed up in 500 words…

I’ve been pretty quiet on this blog since submitting the book manuscript back in June… catching my breath and preparing to resume normal duties mostly. The good news is that the book is now up on the publisher’s catalogue and can even be pre-ordered!  See:  Pervasive Punishment In other exciting… 

Exciting conclusions: Supervision unleashed or restrained?

This time last week I was ensconced in a lovely house in the beautiful Fife village of Anstruther (thanks Heather!), assembling the book chapters into something like a complete manuscript, which now stands at about 72,000 words. Aside from trying to iron out stylistic variations between the chapters and some… 

Recovering hope: The future of supervision?

I didn’t want to leave you for long with just the unhappy ending offered in the last post. So, here again is the plot summary, and then the happier ending… Joe has been placed on supervision (involving probation and electronic monitoring). Pauline is his supervisor. She is a somewhat battle-weary… 

Pervasive Punishment: Long journeys and an unhappy ending?

A couple of weeks ago, I had the pleasure of travelling to the University of Chicago, the University of Minnesota and the John Jay College of Criminal Justice (in New York) to talk about Pervasive Punishment. One of the lovely things about the Mid-Career Fellowship is that it provides some… 

Episode 6: A strangely appealing assembly…

You may remember that a few posts back, I left the supervision short story on a ‘cliff-hanger’ and asked for help with the next episode. The scenario was that Pauline (the probation officer) was worried about Joe (the probationer) seeming to slip into depression and social isolation, and — at… 

Talking Pervasive Punishment (online)

Yesterday, I had the strange pleasure of delivering a talk about the book to the Punishment and Social Control Group of the Law and Society Association. I say strange because it was a case of talking into my computer and hoping that a live YouTube broadcast would work… We did… 

“Academic changes mind!” (But only his own…)

In preparation for writing chapter 6 (the penultimate chapter of the book), I’ve been reading up on debates about ‘public’ or ‘civic’ criminology — and about the relationships between criminology and democratic politics more generally. The slightly sarcastic title of this post is an allusion to the oft-repeated complaint or… 

Landmines or second chances? The enforcement of mass supervision

On 17th November 2017, the New York Times[1] carried an op-ed by Jay-Z entitled ‘Jay-Z: The Criminal Justice System Stalks Black People Like Meek Mill’. Meek Mill is a 30-year old rapper who, at the age of 19, received an 8-month sentence for convictions related to drugs and firearms. Since… 

To be Seen and Heard: A response to songs about supervision

I’m delighted to present the first guest post on this blog, from Jessica Bird, who is Visiting Assistant Professor in Criminology, at the Law & Justice Department of the University of Illinois at Chicago. Following my last post, Jess followed the links to the Vox Liminis ‘Seen and Heard’ EP of songs… 

‘Blankface’ and the ‘Malopticon’

Good news today. A paper that I’ve been tinkering around with for over a year has finally been published in Punishment and Society. You may be able to find the published version via this link. More than most, this paper has been a labour of love. It draws on two encounters…