The shadow of penal supervision

Landmines or second chances? The enforcement of mass supervision

On 17th November 2017, the New York Times[1] carried an op-ed by Jay-Z entitled ‘Jay-Z: The Criminal Justice System Stalks Black People Like Meek Mill’. Meek Mill is a 30-year old rapper who, at the age of 19, received an 8-month sentence for convictions related to drugs and firearms. Since… 

To be Seen and Heard: A response to songs about supervision

I’m delighted to present the first guest post on this blog, from Jessica Bird, who is Visiting Assistant Professor in Criminology, at the Law & Justice Department of the University of Illinois at Chicago. Following my last post, Jess followed the links to the Vox Liminis ‘Seen and Heard’ EP of songs… 

‘Blankface’ and the ‘Malopticon’

Good news today. A paper that I’ve been tinkering around with for over a year has finally been published in Punishment and Society. You may be able to find the published version via this link. More than most, this paper has been a labour of love. It draws on two encounters… 

What is supervision for? Norm and Pauline disagree…

Having spent the last couple of weeks trying to make sense of what numbers can and can’t tell us about mass supervision, I’m just about to get back to more familiar territory; thinking about the purposes of supervision, and how different purposes relate to different ways of legitimating supervision. I’ll… 

Mass supervision: Pervasive and concentrated?

In a previous post, I asked for some help in exploring ‘mass supervision’ in numbers — not just in relation to its scale, but also in relation to its social distribution. Well, I can now report that I spent most of the last week reading Michelle Phelps’ stellar work on… 

Painting by numbers: The scale and distribution of supervision

Happy New Year! Recently, I’ve been enjoying reading about the emerging field of visual criminology. I can’t recommend the excellent Routledge International Handbook of Visual Criminology highly enough. This quote from the introduction in particular piqued my interest:  ‘Criminological and criminal justice optics are incredibly powerful in the ways in which they facilitate practices… 

The story so far — and an invitation…

Thanks for all the positive comments so far about the short story element of this project. I’ve done some editorial tidying up and re-produced the whole thing with a new section — episode 4 — at the end. Finally, two of the characters get to meet and talk. Out of their conversations springs… 

Ways of sensing supervision (and episode 3)

This time, I thought I’d try podcasting for a change. So here’s a short 10 minute recording that discusses how we can better ‘sense’ supervision; it includes episode 3 of the short story for those who have been following that. Once again, I’d really like your feedback on which aspects… 

Pauline, Bob and the difficult second chapter: Punishment changes

Maybe it’s like the ‘difficult second album’? You’ve made a start, created some kind of identity for your work, but now you have to provide not just continuity but some depth and some development. More of the same won’t do. It has to be new and yet familiar. I’m struggling… 

The Ubiquity of Supervision

I’m pleased to report that chapter 1 of the book is ‘in the can’ — at least as a first draft, and that 3 wise scholars and good (critical) friends have agreed to review it for me. Like many authors (I imagine), I find the blank page more than a…